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Bunker Hill Standing Rock Road: Chapter Two

Soon after that we went down for our first visit as the new owners. We met some of the neighbors. Several of them are transplants from West Tennessee. No one lives within view of the house but they take walks down the road now and then. Walter and Hazel live just before us to the east. At first we learned she had cancer, then weeks later we learned that her checkup revealed she was cancer free. Walter told me lots of people had prayed for her and we agreed God is good. They live in a house that might be a little smaller than ours but they have some nice little extra houses, like a log house right behind the main house. Walter said that was the "treasure house." I think the treasure might have been hams, I'm not sure. Walter raises horses, donkeys and mules, which are, of course, offspring of a mama horse and a papa donkey. I tried to tell some of my co-workers at Measurement Inc. about the genetic makeup of a mule but few were interested; some were downright uninterested. Go figure.

One of the things I knew needed attention was the west side of the barn. I inspected it of course before buying the place, but of course now that we own it it looks a lot worse. Due to a tree growing up right beside the barn and rubbing on the edge of the roof year after year, that side has deteriated. Maybe the tree is not the only culprit. Anyway the log sills are nearly gone on that side and the wall and roof have suffered. Exposure to water has rotted some of the interior partitions and floors also. I need some used hewn beams for the sills if I'm going to put it back like it was. Also about a thousand board feet of oak lumber, some oak two-by-fours and some metal roofing. I want to restore it like it was if I possibly can.

The barn was built in 1913. I know because the carpenter left his initials. From the looks of the sills that the walls and partitions are built on, it seems they came from a log house that must have been taken down previously on the property. So I'm assuming our farm had a "treasure house" also, but it was cannibalized for its parts. That's the way it goes. I've learned that part of the state of Tennessee was inhabited by white settlers by the 1820's so it would stand to reason the log houses would have been built before the civil war, then later the larger frame houses were constructed. I sure would like to have a one room log house for the property—if you know of one going cheap let me know.

As I write this it is the twelfth of August, 2006 and it has been uncommonly hot here for the past three or four weeks. When the weather cools some I want to get busy on the barn.

Labor day my friend David Adkins went with me to help me with the unending task of mowing grass. That was very kind of him. After I showed him around he noticed something I didn't. It was a great big huge hornet's nest on the front porch. He told me how dangerous they could be and so we watched them carefully while starting to mow. As it turned out no hornets buzzed in or out of the thing while we were there. It turned out my neighbor Walter Blalack killed them for us. I sure was thankful. Here are pictures of David and the hornet's nest.

For the rest of that first year We made short trips to mow grass and take care of urgencies. Every time I went I poured buckets of water on Leslie's little trees she had planted. In the fall when the weather was cool we had company for the first time. Mark, Elizabeth and Benjamin drove with us for a picnic: One, two, three. I had the gas turned on and the gas heater in the front room worked just fine—that is, if you were standing right in front of it. I only visited the house two or three times during the winter because I didn't have much money for materials to work or for gasoline.

Go to Country House Chapter Three


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Just ten miles from my place. Kathy and Michael Dumont have delightfully redone this small town hotel. It's a great place to lodge in Linden and Perry County.

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